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BEE – What you need to know

How Do I Become B-BBEE Compliant?

BEE (B-BBEE) is an important part of doing business in South Africa so its best that you understand every aspect about it. Use this comprehensive guide to ensure your business is compliant and performing at its best.

Content in this guide

  • What Is Black Economic Empowerment (BEE)
  • Why Is BEE Referred To As B-BBEE?
  • Who Must Comply With BEE?
  • Legislation
  • How To Qualify For BEE
  • Understanding What Each Pillar Means
  • What Are Codes Of Good Practice For Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment?
  • Levels (Of Compliance)
  • What Is SANAS?
  • Rating Process
  • What To Look For In A B-BBEE Partner

What is Black Economic Empowerment (BEE)

Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) is a government initiative aimed at increasing equity and uplifting black business owners, stakeholders and employees. The government refers to BEE as ‘positive discrimination’.

BEE is the process by which previously disadvantaged South Africans have been empowered through the transfer of ownership. Compliance with BEE principles are regulated by Codes, which provide details on how BEE should be implemented.


Why is BEE referred to as BBBEE?

When Black Employment Equity (BEE) was first implemented in the nineties, there was no coherent strategy towards its implementation. When the South African Government gazetted updated Codes of Good Practice at the beginning of 2007, it made the implementation of Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) a legal reality.

Even though most think of Black Employment Equity as BEE, as the process was refined, its name changed to Broad-Based Black Employment Equity (B-BBEE) in order to encompass not just Blacks, but Coloured, Indians and the Chinese populations of South Africa.


Who Must Comply with BEE?

 

Size is relevant in determining the levels of B-BBEE compliance. All organs of state, public entities and any private enterprise that undertakes business with a public entity must implement the Codes.

Any business providing goods or services to another business that is subject to BEE (B-BBEE) compliance may also need to provide evidence of its own BEE (B-BBEE) compliance.

The size of your business is significant in determining the required levels of BEE (B-BBEE) compliance. The Codes provide for three levels of compliance based on the size of your business:

  • Exempted Micro Enterprises (EMEs), which are businesses with an annual turnover of less than R10 million. This is a new amendment, EMEs were previously businesses with an annual turnover of less than R300 000 and less than five staff members.
  • Qualifying Small Enterprises (QSEs), which are businesses with an annual turnover of between R10 to R50 million.
  • Medium to large enterprises (M&Ls), which are businesses with an annual turnover of more than R50 million.

Advantages of BEE compliance

  • Allows participation in the formal South African economy
  • Companies will favour you as a client, particularly those aiming to acquire at least 50% of annual procurement from companies with BEE (B-BBEE) certificates.
  • Able to bid for Government tenders, apply for licences, get permits and are favourably considered for procurements by the Public Sector and all BEE (B-BBEE) verified enterprises.
  • Have access to tax incentives and financial grants, specifically aimed at the BEE (B-BBEE) programme.
  • Avoid long questionnaires relating to BEE (B-BBEE) when tendering for a contract.

Legislation Governing B-BBEE

There are three important pieces of legislation that control B-BBEE, namely:

Employment Equity Act (1998)

The Employment Equity Act applies to black people, all women and disabled people, in addition, stipulates the requirements for affirmative action to ensure that qualified people from these groups are equitably represented in all occupational categories and levels of a company.

The Act is binding on any business that employs 50 or more staff, or that has an annual turnover of more than R2 million to R25 million (depending on the industry in which you operate).

Skills Development Act (1998) and Skills Development Levy Act (1999)

These provide a framework for improving the skills and employment prospects of black people.

These Acts also make it compulsory for certain employers to contribute a percentage of their payroll (known as the Skills Development Levy) to a fund that can be used to train staff. The current generic B-BBEE scorecard awards points for skills development, but only for that which is over and above the payment of this levy.

Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act (2000)

This allows any State entity to give preference to black people when awarding contracts. It also aims to boost SME development, create new jobs and promote local enterprises in specific provinces. Currently, the regulations of this Act are based largely on ownership, but this is likely to be revised in order to align it with the B-BBEE Act and Codes.


How to Qualify For BEE (B-BBEE)

 

There are four steps you’ll need to take to ensure you qualify for BEE (B-BBEE), including:

Step 1 – Select Your Company’s Annual Turnover

The size of your business is significant in determining the required levels of BEE (B-BBEE) compliance. The Codes provide for three levels of compliance based on the size of your business:

Exempted Micro Enterprises (EMEs), which are businesses with an annual turnover of less than R10 million. This is a new amendment, EMEs were previously businesses with an annual turnover of less than R300 000 and less than five staff members.

Qualifying Small Enterprises (QSEs), which are businesses with an annual turnover between R10 to R50 million.

Medium to large enterprises (M&Ls), are businesses with an annual turnover of more than R50 million.

Step 2 – Match the Turnover to the Scorecard

EMEs are exempt. However, these businesses will automatically receive a level associated with its percentage of black ownership, such as:

Black ownership BEE (B-BBEE) Status Level Procurement Recognition
100% Black Owned EME Level 1 135%
>50% Black Owned EME Level 2 125%
<50% Black Owned EME Level 4 100%

The annual turnover must be verified by an accredited accountant, auditor or rating agency.

QSE’s used to be able to choose four out of the seven BEE Scorecard elements to score their points. However, from 2014, QSEs must comply with all 5 elements of the revised BEE (B-BBEE) Scorecard to score their points.

M&L must comply with all 5 elements of the revised BEE (B-BBEE) Scorecard to score their points.

Step 3 – Determine the Number of Pillars Required For Your Scorecard

The five pillars of B-BBEE are:

  1. Ownership (Direct empowerment)
  2. Management Control (Indirect empowerment)
  3. Skills Development
  4. Enterprise Development
  5. Socio-Economic Development.

Step 4 – Select the Pillars For Your Scorecard

Each of the pillars is worth a certain ‘weight’ in its contribution to B-BBEE compliance. The pillars contribute to overall compliance as follows:

  • Ownership                25%
  • Management                19%
  • Skills Development            20%
  • Enterprise Development        40%
  • Socio-Economic Development     5%.

Ownership, skills development and enterprise development are now considered priority pillars and a minimum of 40% compliance is mandatory, in order to achieve level 1 B-BBEE.


Understanding What Each Pillar Means

It is important to understand the requirements of each pillar.

Ownership (counts 25 points)

When determining the level of black ownership, a business will score points based on the
following:

  • The extent to which black people can influence the strategic direction of the business through their shareholding
  • The current net value of their shares
  • The amount of profit (percentage of each Rand) that accrues to all of these black shareholders.
  • Whether these shares are paid for in full, or will be within 10 years or less.
  • Bonus points are awarded if any of the black shareholders are new entrants (who have not previously benefited from a B-BBEE deal)

Management (counts 19 points)

This refers to the proportion of black people who control the direction of the business as well as those in top management who control day-to-day operations.

Skills Development (counts 20 points)

Skills development measures a business’s investment in the training and development of black employees. Only specific types of learning programmes and learnerships qualify when claiming points on the skills development scorecard.

Enterprise Development (counts 40 points)

If the business offers support programmes, then you can claim points on the scorecard. For example, if you donate a vehicle to one of your black company drivers so that he or she can start a delivery company, you qualify.

Socio-Economic Development (counts 5 points)

Companies that spend at least 1% of net profits after tax (NPAT) on Social-Economic Development (SED) are eligible for 5 points under this pillar.

Social-Economic Development (SED), however, is not Corporate Social Investment (CSI). SED’s criteria demands that those being assisted gain long-term access to the economy and receive a lasting benefit. According to the definition in the legislature, any initiative should “facilitate income-generating activities”.


What Are Codes of Good Practice For Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (B-BBEE)?

 

The Codes of Good Practice refers to options that businesses can use in order to evaluate and track their B-BBEE efforts. Within the new B-BBEE regulations companies must meet specific targets. The codes are there to guide businesses into receiving an accurate rating, which it can include on the company profile.

The Codes of Good Practice are legally binding on all state and state-owned entities. These businesses have 10 years to reach this target, which means government will have to use the Codes to measure its B-BBEE compliance when choosing suppliers, granting licences or making concessions. The cascade effect of this focus on B-BBEE compliant companies is that non-compliant businesses will find it hard to grow or maintain their level of business success within South Africa.

On the other hand, private companies will also need to apply the codes if they want to do business with any government enterprise – in order to tender for business, apply for licences and concessions, enter into public-private partnerships or buy state-owned assets.

The Act is broken up into nine Subsections.

  • Code 000: Framework for Measuring Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment
  • Code 100: Measurement of the Ownership Element
  • Code 200: Measurement of the Management Control Element
  • Code 300: Measurement of the Employment Element
  • Code 400: Measurement of the Skills Development Element
  • Code 500: Measurement of the Preferential Procurement Element
  • Code 600: Measurement of the Enterprise Development Element
  • Code 700: Measurement of the Socio-Economic Development Element
  • Code 800: Measurement of Qualifying Small Enterprises.

Sector Codes Are an Extension of Codes of Good Practice

Companies must also be aware of Sector Codes, which are an extension of the Codes, but apply within a specified industry sector only. For example, there is a Construction Sector Code (a new draft to appear in 2017), a Property Sector Code, Financial Sector Code and Tourism Sector Code. Sector codes are industry-specific interventions and measures driven by major stakeholders in industries where the codes are developed.


Levels (Of Compliance)

B-BBEE Contribution Level “Old” 
Scorecard Points
Amended
Scorecard Points
B-BBEE Procurement Recognition Level
1 ≥100 points ≥100 points 135%
2 ≥ 85 but < 100 ≥ 95 but < 100 125%
3 ≥ 75 but < 85 ≥ 90 but < 95 110%
4 ≥ 65 but < 75 ≥ 80 but < 90 100%
5 ≥ 55 but < 65 ≥ 75 but < 80 80%
6 ≥ 45 but < 55 ≥ 70 but < 75 60%
7 ≥ 40 but <45 ≥ 55 but <70 50%
8 ≥ 30 but < 40 ≥ 40 but < 55 10%
Non-Compliant < 30 < 40 0%

Customers (public and private) will prefer to interact and procure from companies with higher B-BBEE status (for its own recognition), level 1 being the ultimate goal. These are the current B-BBEE status levels:


What Is SANAS?

The South African National Accreditation System (SANAS) is recognised by the South African Government as the single National Accreditation Body that gives formal B-BBEE recognition. A B-BBEE Certificate can be issued by any Verification Agency so long as they are approved to do so by SANAS. The Certificate can only be issued once a full verification has been performed and the documentation presented by your company has been verified. SANAS certificates are a formal recognition that an organisation is competent to perform specific tasks.

Ratings Agencies must perform the assessments strictly according to the guidelines set out by the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI). On successful completion it will issue a certificate with the Level (1-9) of BEE (B-BBEE) compliance appropriate to your enterprise.

  • A certificate will be issued, which is relevant to all companies requesting it.
  • B-BBEE must be validated by a SANAS accredited verification agency.
  • Self-accreditation is no longer recognised or accepted.

B-BBEE Rating Process

The rating process only applies to QSEs and M&L’s:

Step 1: Application, Approval and Payment

  • Measured Entity (ME) requests an Application Form
  • Client Manager sends Application Form to ME
  • ME completes and returns Application Form to Client Manager
  • Client Manager sends Application Form to Verifications Manager
  • Verifications Manager reviews and approves application against prescribed criteria.
  • Client Manager sends Quotation and/or Invoice to ME.
  • ME approves the quote and pays a commitment fee (65% of quoted/Invoiced amount).

Step 2: Pre-site Visit and Legal Processes

  • Client Manager prepares and sends SLA and other contracts for signature by ME
  • Lead Analyst visits ME for a briefing, to explain the verification process and to agree on Verification Plan, Team and deadlines.
  • ME prepares all required documents and sends them to Client Manager.
  • Client Manager signs-off Document Register acknowledging receipt and hands documents over to Lead Analyst.

Step 3: Analysis, Site visit, Reporting and Certification

  • Lead Analyst performs a basic analysis and measures entity against scorecard.
  • Lead Analyst visits ME on site for Verification as agreed on Verification Plan.
  • Lead Analyst prepares Verification Report and Recommendation for Verifications Manager.
  • Verifications Manager performs Vertical Assessment and Quality Assurance on report and then approves recommendation report.
  • Client Manager sends Verification Report and Rating to ME for approval.
  • ME approves Verification Report and Rating.
  • Verifications Manager issues a Rating Certificate and Final Report.
  • Client Manager sends Rating Certificate and Final Report to ME.

Who Should Manage B-BBEE Processes In a Business?

The best way to structure the management process is as follows:

  • Chief Executive Officer – Ownership and Management Control
  • Chief Financial Officer – Preferential Procurement and Enterprise Development
  • Employment Equity Committee – Socio-economic Development, Skills Development and Employment Equity.

The Employment Equity Committee needs training, as they are likely to have limited experience in making strategic recommendations to the CEO on these issues. The CEO should sit in the Employment Equity Committee along with someone with HR experience.

Did You Know?

Unlike State-owned entities, private companies are free to develop their own procurement policies, which may include different criteria and different weightings to that of the generic B-BBEE scorecard.


What to Look For In a B-BBEE Partner

When looking for a new partner, specifically for B-BBEE, companies arguably rush through the process. This could leave your business open to having two unaligned partners at the top, trying to force the business into opposite directions, thinking that they each know what’s right for the company.

Every successful business partnership needs three things:

  1. Someone who can add value to your business
  2. Operate in a growing industry
  3. Bringing additional finances or resources to the table.

A good partnership won’t happen overnight; it could take you up to 18 months to work out the details with your new B-BBEE partner. So, using it as an eleventh-hour attempt to save your business or when there’s a big tender on the line, might not work out for you.

To be successful, it’s better to go into this process with the right motives. A great B-BBEE partnership is mutually beneficial and based on growth potential for all involved.

Align Vision and Values

Partner with someone who shares your vision and values in business. Both partners need to be clear on their roles within the business and what they will need to contribute towards the business. Like all great partnerships, a B-BBEE partnership is also built on alignment.

You want a partner who will bring critical skills, experience, knowledge or maybe resources to the table. Having a partner who is only fronting can damage your business’ reputation. Fronting is when you have a partner in name only in order to qualify for a higher B-BBEE level.

Searching For the Right Partner

Networking in the wrong environment can be detrimental, just like networking in the right environment can be advantageous to you and your business.

Ask people you trust for advice or if they know someone who is compatible with you and your work style. You’ll need to approach this as a long-term endeavour as it takes time to find the right person.

Once you’ve found your new partner, structure the best deal possible through a top notch legal team. This will protect both parties if the partnership doesn’t work out. Include roles and responsibilities within the contract, so everyone is accountable, and knows what will result should the endeavour fail.

Source. https://www.entrepreneurmag.co.za/ask-entrepreneur/doing-business-in-sa-ask-entrepreneur/how-do-i-become-bee-compliant/

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Management

Who may and how do you apply for business rescue?

The sort answer to “who apply for business rescue” is – any company or close corporation which is financially distressed may file for business rescue proceedings, except for external companies.

Who can apply for business rescue

Financially distressed is defined in the Companies Act as:

“in reference to a particular company at any particular time means that

i. It appears to be reasonably unlikely that the company will be able to pay all of its debts as they fall due and payable within the immediately ensuing six months; or

ii. It appears to be reasonably likely that the company will become insolvent within the immediately ensuing six months”

As a company is afforded certain protections against creditors during business rescue a company may not merely make a filing when it is not financially distressed. Should the business practitioner’s assessment determine that the company is not financially stressed the process may be cancelled or alternatively, another affected party may also apply to have the process set aside.

An external company is basically a branch of a foreign company operating in South Africa that has been registered with the CIPC.

How do you apply

There are three ways in which business rescue proceedings may be initiated for a company

1. Voluntary business rescue

If the Board of Directors has reasonable grounds to believe that the company is financially stressed as defined above, then they may resolve to voluntarily place the company under supervision.

A copy of the resolution together with a Form 123.1 – Notice of Beginning of Business Rescue Proceedings must be filed with the CIPC.

The board of directors cannot adopt such a resolution if liquidation procedures have been initiated by or against the company

The application for business rescue will be voided if the company does not

  • Within 5 days of having adopted and filed the resolution
    • Publish a notice of the resolution to every affected person together with a sworn statement of the facts relevant to the grounds on which the board resolution was founded; and
    • Appoint a business rescue practitioner who has consented in writing to accept the position.
  • File a notice of the appointment a practitioner within 2 days of the appointment and
  • Publish a notice of the business rescue practitioner’s appointment to all affected parties within 5 days of it being filed.

If the business rescue proceedings are voided the company may not make another application for a period of 3 months.

If the Board of directors reasonably believes a company is distressed but does not resolve to initiate business rescue proceedings, it is obliged to advise all affected persons of the applicable criteria and reasons for not adopting a business rescue resolution.

2. Compulsory or court ordered business rescue

In this case an affected person may apply to the court to have the company placed in business rescue.

An affected person may be one of the following

  • A creditor
  • An employee or a trade union representing the employees
  • A Shareholder

An affected person making an application to court is required to notify all affected parties, the company and the CIPC of the application and these parties may also participate in the hearing.

All affected parties must be informed within 5 days of any order being granted.

3. Court order during liquidation proceedings

As per option 2, an affected person may apply to the court to have the company placed in business rescue at any time during liquidation proceedings.

The liquidation application pending at the time that an application for business rescue proceedings is made is stayed until the court has dispensed with the application or the business rescue proceedings have been concluded.

A company that has been placed into business rescue in terms of a court order may not apply for liquidation until the business rescue is concluded.

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Management

What Business Practitioner is Required?

If you are considering Business Rescue then you might be wondering what Business Practitioner is required for your business.

Business Rescue Practitioner Categories

If you are considering that question then you are in the right place, so let’s dive right in.

So when considering what Business Practitioner is required you need to understand that Business Rescue Practitioners fall into 3 categories:

  1. Senior Practitioner – actively engaged with business rescue for a period of at least 10 years.
  2. Experienced Practitioner – actively engaged with business rescue for a period of at least 5 years
  3. Junior Practitioner – actively engaged with business rescue for a period of at least 5 years

Company Classification

Companies undergoing business rescue fall into 3 categories

1. Large Companies

A company other than a state-owned enterprise with a public interest score greater than 500

2. Medium Companies

a. A public company with a public interest score of less than 500

b. A company other than a state-owned enterprise with a public interest score greater that 100 but less than 500

3. Small companies

A company other than a state-owned enterprise with a public interest score less than 100

Appointment Criteria

A Junior Practitioner may be appointed as a BRP to a small company

An Experienced Practitioner may be appointed as a BRP to a Small or Medium company. An
experienced BRP may also be appointed to a large company or state-owner enterprise but must be
assisted by a Senior Practitioner
A Senior Practitioner may be appointed as a BRP to any company

Public Interest Score

The public interest score is defined in the Companies Act and is calculated as the sum of

  • Number of points equal to the average number of employees during the year
  • One point for every R1 million of third-party liability at the financial year end
  • One point for every R1 million turnover during the year
  • One point for every individual who, at the financial year end, is known to the company
    • In the case of a profit company to, directly or indirectly have a beneficial interest in any issued securities of the company
    • In the case of an NPO to be a member of the company or a member of an association who is a member of the company.

Business Rescue Practitioner Rates

In terms of the companies Act a BRP can charge a company in business rescue for remuneration and expenses according to a tariff prescribed by the Minister.

The BRP may also propose additional remuneration – a contingency/success fee based on

  • The acceptance of a business plan (within a certain timeframe) or certain matters being included in the plan
  • The attainment of a certain result/s

The BRP rates are specified in the Companies Act Regulations; however, these rates have not been adjusted for a number of years and it is normal when negotiating a fee with a client for these fees to be adjusted for inflation.

The basic remuneration as per the current tariff prescribed by the Minister stipulates that the remuneration cannot exceed:

  • Small Companies – R1 250/hour or R15 625/day (incl. VAT)
  • Medium Companies – R1 500/hour or R18 750/day (incl. VAT)
  • Large Companies – R2 000/hour or R25 000/day (incl. VAT)

In addition to above the BRP can be reimbursed for any expenses they incur in performing their duties.

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Management

What is the business rescue timetable

Ever wondered what the what is the business rescue timetable? The business rescue proceedings are defined in chapter 6 of the Companies Act and are administered by the CIPC.

Background

As companies entering business rescue are financially stressed, time is of the essence and any rescue plan needs to be compiled and implemented as soon as is practically possible.

The process is accordingly well-defined and requires strict adherence to a number of deadlines with serious consequences should they not be met.

While it is possible to apply to the CIPC or if relevant the court, for an extension for number of deadlines, this article attempts to provide a general timetable of events that need to occur. The timetable below is applicable to the voluntary process of applying for business rescue as opposed to a court order.

Business Rescue Timetable

1. Application

The board of directors must file the prescribed form and a copy of the resolution with the CIPC.

Within 5 days of the board of directors having adopted and filed a resolution to commence business rescue proceedings they must

  • Publish a notice of the resolution to every affected person together with a sworn statement of the facts relevant to the grounds on which the board resolution was founded; and
  • Appoint a business rescue practitioner who has consented in writing to accept the position.

2. Business rescue practitioner appointment

The board of directors must

  • File a notice of the appointment a practitioner within 2 days of the appointment and
  • Publish a notice of the business rescue practitioner’s appointment to all affected parties within 5 days of it being filed.

A failure to comply with 1 and 2 will void the business rescue proceedings.

3. Duration

If the business rescue proceedings have not been concluded after 3 months the business rescue practitioner needs to prepare a report on the proceedings. They will then need to update it at the end of each subsequent month until the end of proceedings and deliver it to each affected person and the CIPC.

4. Directors cooperation

With 5 days of the commencement of business rescue proceedings, or such longer period that the practitioner allows, the directors of a company must provide the practitioner with a statement of affairs which contains as a minimum certain information as specified in the Companies Act

5. Practitioner’s remuneration

Any creditor or shareholder who voted against the proposed remuneration for the practitioner may apply to the court within 10 business days for an order setting aside the agreement

6. First meeting of creditors

Within 10 days of being appointed the business rescue practitioner must convene and preside over a first meeting with creditors

The practitioner must determine who are secured, unsecured or concurrent creditors. The practitioner may have the value of a concurrent creditor’s claim independently appraised. In this instance the practitioner must give the concurrent creditor notice of that appraisal at least 15 days before the meeting to determine the future of company (as per 9 below).

Within 5 days of receiving the appraisal the creditor can apply to the court to review the appraisal.

7. First meeting of employees

Within 10 days of being appointed the business rescue practitioner must convene and preside over a first meeting with employees

8. Publication of business plan

The business rescue plan must be published within 25 days after the date on which the practitioner was appointed.

9. Meeting to determine the future of company

Within 10 days of publication of the plan, the practitioner must convene and preside over a meeting of creditors and any other holders of a voting interest to consider the proposed business rescue plan

  • At least 5 business days before the meeting the practitioner must deliver a notice of the meeting to all affected persons
  • If a vote is taken regarding the business rescue plan and an affected party or the practitioners intends to apply to court to have the vote set aside the practitioner must adjourn the meeting for 5 days to allow the court to deal with the matter
  • If, on the request of the practitioner or called upon by an affected person to prepare and publish a revised business rescue plan in terms of the provisions of the Act, the practitioner must do so within 10 business days.
  • If an affected person makes an offer to acquire the rights and claims of another affected person as provided for, the practitioner must adjourn the meeting for no more than 5 days to make the necessary revisions to the business rescue plan.

Termination

The business rescue process terminates when either

  • The court
    • Sets aside the resolution on which the business rescue proceedings were initiated
    • Has converted the proceedings to liquidation proceedings
  • The practitioner has filed a notice of the termination of business rescue proceedings or
  • The business rescue plan has been
    • Rejected and no person acted to extend the proceedings
    • Adopted and the practitioner has subsequently filed a notice of substantial implementation of that plan.

Conclusion

While the Companies Act provides for a defined time frame the financial reality of the company will often dictate that timing of the process. Successful business rescue proceedings often take substantially longer that provided for in the Companies Act.

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Looking for Business Rescue Practitioners? Look no further than Adarna. With decades of business experience our registered Business Rescue Practitioners and Business Turnaround Experts are here to assist you and your business.

Download A Guide to Business Rescue to get started

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