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Funding & grants for black business

Small and micro business sectors are the main source of real employment in the economy.

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Funding for Black Entrepreneurs from Government Grants & Funds

How do you raise funding? A small business can on average employ 12 people. The drop in entrepreneurial activity over the past five years is equal to 2.3 million possible job opportunities lost. Small and micro business sectors are the main source of real employment in the economy.

South Africa’s economy needs to inspire entrepreneurship in order for it to grow. By creating an environment that is friendlier to small businesses and actively encouraging the sector, the country is in a better position to create jobs.

Two simple measures that would go a long way to support and develop entrepreneurs is access to finance and improvement of logistics.

Content in this guide

  1. National Empowerment Fund (NEF)
  2. Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) Funding
  3. Small Enterprise Finance Agency (SEFA)
  4. The Isivande Women’s Fund (IWF)
  5. Khula SME Fund
  6. Black Business Supplier Development Programme (BBSDP)
  7. Incubation Support Programme (ISP)
  8. National Youth Development Agency (NYDA)
  9. PDF Download

Government Funds

The government created government funding to extend finances to previously disadvantaged South African’s in order to develop black economic development. Your much needed capital investment could come from government funding opportunities.

Financing a small business, whether you’re starting-up or trying to expand, is a challenge all entrepreneurs go through. Here are a few examples of government funding that focuses on black entrepreneurs:


1 National Empowerment Fund (NEF)

The NEF is, a part of the government’s development mandate to encourage black participation in business and entrepreneurship. It helps to assist black entrepreneurs in achieving funding. This fund aims to assist black youth, women and men, communities and businesses to achieve sustainable success.

Types of NEF Funding

The NEF has four main channels of funding that consist of subdivisions. These are:

1. iMbewu Fund:

  • This consists of subdivision is entrepreneur finance, procurement finance and franchise finance.
  • This fund supports black entrepreneurs who are starting up a new business or expanding an existing one.
  • This contribution takes the form of offering debt counselling, quasi-equity and equity finance products.
  • The funds contribution ranges from R250 000 to a maximum of R10 million

2. uMnotho Fund:

  • This NEF funding has subdivisions in finance, new venture finance, expansion capital, capital markets, and liquidity and warehousing.
  • This fund is available to black entrepreneurs who manage or own businesses, new ventures, expanding existing business. It is also available to black entrepreneurs who want to buy a share of equity in black and white owned businesses.
  • The contributions from this fund range from R2 million to R75 million.

3. Rural and Community Development Fund:

  • This NEF fund has subdivisions in acquisition, new venture capital, expansion capital and start-up/green categories.
  • The creation of this government fund is to promote sustainable change in social and economic relations along with supporting and developing the rural economy by financing sustainable enterprises and co-operatives.
  • This NEF funding ranges from R1 million to R50 million.

3. Strategic Projects:

  • This NEF fund has subdivisions of empowerment objectives.
  • The aim of the government fund is to increase black participation in early-stage projects.
  • These projects need to have economic merit and the ability to deliver on the government’s development mandate.

How Can You Apply for NEF Funding?

NEF funding is available for start-up and existing businesses. It will conduct the following processes when evaluating your business:

  1. It will conduct a, self-needs analysis to determine how the NEF funding can assist your businesses needs and which offer is best suited.
  2. You will need to provide an application form and a comprehensive proposal with evidence that supports the commercial viability and financial position of your business.
  3. After you’ve submitted your application to the NEF, it will assess your information for final approval and receiving of funds.
  4. The NEF website offers the following checklist to ensure you include everything needed when applying for funding.
  5. You’ll need to meet all the requirements or your application won’t be successfully considered.
  6. This process can take up to six weeks.
  7. If your application is successful, it could take up to three to four months to receive NEF funding.

Contact Details for NEF Funding

  • For more information about the NEF fund, visit www.nefcorp.co.za.
  • Email general enquiries to info@nefcorp.co.za
  • Or call the following numbers +27 (0)11 305 8000 or 0861 843 633 (call centre).

2

Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) Funding

IDC funding is available to those who have an existing business or wish to start a new one; those that have the visions of job creation along with serving previously disadvantaged communities.

The IDC achieves its goals by providing finance for industrial projects, promoting partnerships between and across industries within SA and internationally. It focuses on projects that finance and facilitate, that lead to the creation and innovation of new industries. It also focuses on diverse expertise to drive growth in priority sectors and to take on higher-risk funding projects.

The IDC supports B-BBEE and actively boosts and promotes black-owned and managed business along with those with employment equity. It aims at developing the skills of black employees and business owners, by supporting local, regional, provincial and national government projects.

The Different Types of IDC Funding

1. Development Funds.

  • These funds aim at supporting projects that will have high long-term impacts on the economy through growth.
  • Its aim is to bring projects out of the informal sector and into the economic mainstream.
  • Please find more information on these funds and links to the online application process here.

2. Agro-Processing Competitiveness Fund

  • This government fund provides support and helps businesses to achieve increased competitiveness, business growth, job creation and development in the agro-processing and beverages industries.
  • For further information and a link for the online application process please visit here.

3. Product Process Development Scheme (PPD)

  • The aim of this fund is to provide financial support to micro and small enterprises where the total assets are below R5 million, annual turnover is less than R13 million, and the business employs less than 50 people.
  • The fund intends to promote innovation and technology development with financial support.
  • This enables the development of new products and/or processes.
  • For more information on the PPD Scheme continue to the website here, to apply for funding, please visit their website http://www.idc.co.za/, click on “Online Funding” and follow the prompts.

4. Risk Capital Facility Programme

  • IDC Funding aimed at providing risk finance to businesses owned by previously disadvantaged individuals that offer substantial job creation potential.
  • For more information on the Risk Capital Facility Programme continue to the website here, to apply for funding please visit their website http://www.idc.co.za/, click on “Online Funding” and follow the prompts.

This programme provides three channels of funding:

  1. Direct channel operating alongside IDC’s mainstream business
  2. Through a niche fund channel
  3. Third party channel.

5. Transformation and Entrepreneurship Scheme

  • This fund finances marginalised groups of South Africans such as women and the disabled.
  • The aim of the fund is to gain access to finance that will help to develop and grow your business as a start-up or through expansions or acquisitions.
  • This IDC funding also offers mentorship and non-financial support including business planning, training and mentorship.
  • For more information on the Transformation and Entrepreneurship Scheme continue to the website here, to apply for funding please visit their website http://www.idc.co.za/, click on “Online Funding” and follow the prompts.

6. Green Energy Efficiency Fund

  • The fund aims at improving energy efficiency and helping South Africa become a low-carbon economy.
  • It aims to drive down energy related costs, improve production capacity, operational effectiveness and competitiveness, which would aid in job creation.
  • For more information on the Green Energy Efficiency Fund continue to the website here, to apply for funding please visit their website http://www.idc.co.za/, click on “Online Funding” and follow the prompts.

How Can You Apply for IDC Funding?

The IDC government funds aims are: Job creation potential, rural development, urban renewal and poverty alleviation, the employment of women and youth as well as up-skilling of employees. All of the projects that the IDC funds, need to show economic viability and sustainability and should target previously disadvantaged groups, women, people with disabilities, low income working groups and marginalised communities.

Contact the IDC for funding

  • For more information on any of the funds visit www.idc.co.za, click on “Online Funding” and follow the prompts.
  • You can also phone the IDC call centre on 0860 69 38 88
  • Or email callcentre@idc.co.za.

3 Small Enterprise Finance Agency (SEFA)

Do you have an existing small business or want to start one? SEFA are piloting direct finance to entrepreneurs wanting to start or grow a business.

Types of SEFA Funding

SEFA provides direct funding to business in loans between R50 000 and R3 million in three different ways: Directly to business owners, via retail finance intermediaries, and through banks using credit guarantee schemes including Khula.

1. Bridging loans

  • These are short-term loans, which provide working capital.
  • The types of working capital offered by this government fund include stock purchases and operating overheads. This loan is offered for only one year.

2. Term loans

  • This government fund is a loan of a specific amount and has a specified repayment schedule, amount and interest rate.
  • This type of SEFA funding is normally used to finance your assets that have a medium to long-term lifespan, for example machinery, vehicles, office equipment.
  • Term loans can be used to expand your business or for acquisitions.
  • This loan has a repayment range of one to five years.

3. Structured finance

  • Use this SEFA facility for funding that falls outside the parameters of the term and bridge loans.
  • Provided by a debt facility, it can be repaid over a period of five years and tailored to your unique requirements.
  • The following businesses can’t apply from the benefits of this fund: Liquor, tobacco, gambling, sex trade, armaments, speculative real estate, leveraged buy-out funds, and illegal trade.
  • This includes any business activity that would tarnish SEFA’s reputation, political organisation, entrepreneurs under debt review, insolvent business owners and business.



How to Apply for SEFA Funding?

Your start-up and existing survivalist, micro, small and medium business must meet these criteria:

  1. Submit a completed application form
  2. Submit a completed comprehensive business plan that meet SEFA’s application requirements. Include initial and supporting documentation.
  3. Demonstrated ability to repay loans
  4. Personal and business credit references
  5. The applicant must be an owner manager
  6. The applicant must be a South African citizen with ID documents or a valid permanent residence. Alternatively, the business can be in the control of a South African citizen.
  7. The business must be legally constituted including sole traders with a fixed physical address
  8. Must have contractual capacity
  9. All operations including projects, programmes activities etc. must be within South Africa
  10. The enterprise must be compliant with accepted corporate governance practices
  11. A trust that has within the trust deed the power to borrow money and pledge assets as security and to give surety for borrowing.

Contact SEFA for funding

  • Visit www.sefa.org.za for more information on regional branches, how to apply, exclusion criteria, products and services available. To contact head office, call 0860 00 73 32.
  • To apply for Sefa Funding visit their website http://www.sefa.org.za/, you can either submit your application online or you can print it out and submit to their physical offices. You can see the contact information for both online and physical submissions for all their funds here.

4 The Isivande Women’s Fund (IWF)

This government fund aims at accelerating women’s economic empowerment by supplying cost effective, user friendly and responsive, available finance. The IWF offers support services to improve the success of your business.

It targets business that are starting up, expanding, rehabilitating, franchising and those that need bridging finance. The aim of the fund is to create self-sustaining black and women owned businesses by offering you primary financial and non-financial support.

How to Apply for IWF Funding

The women owned companies need to meet the following criteria to be eligible:

  1. Operational for 6 months.
  2. Needs early stage capital for expansions and growth.
  3. 50% plus one share owned and managed by women.
  4. Have potential growth and commercial sustainability.
  5. Improving social impact with employment creation.

Contact IWF for funding

  • Businesses that are eligible and need funding between R30 000 and R2 million can submit their application.
  • Apply to the IWF through the IDF website or call +27 (11) 772 7910.
  • Download the application form here www.idf.co.za.

5 Khula SME Fund

Offered by Khula Enterprise Finance Ltd, this government funds aim is to grow and increase sustainability of small businesses.

The purpose of the fund is to:

  • Offers SME’s early-stage and expansion capital.
  • Offer early-stage debt funding to business that meet the criteria.
  • Support SME’s in rural and peri-urban areas.
  • Improve the business owners access to finance.
  • Grow businesses so they can create new jobs.
  • Encourage meaningful economic involvement of black South Africans.
  • Foster entrepreneurship for men and women within the SME sector.

How to Apply for Khula Funding?

The following are the requirements for business wanting to apply for Khula government fund:

  • South African SME who have a majority share in their company and who are seeking to start and/or grow their company.
  • South African SME’s who have a majority share in their business that is in rural areas.

Contact Khula for funding

  • Business that are eligible and need funding can contact Khula at: +27 (0)11 807 8464.
  • To apply for Khula funding, visit the SEFA website http://www.sefa.org.za/,you can either submit your application online or you can print it out and submit to their physical offices. You can see the contact information for both online and physical submissions for the Khula Fund here.

6 Black Business Supplier Development Programme (BBSDP)

The Black Business Supplier Development Programme (BBSDP) is a cost-sharing grant that offers black-owned businesses improve their competitiveness and sustainability.

This government grant does not support start-ups, only the expansions of existing business.

The aim of this government grant is to fast-track small and micro-enterprises, encourage links between black-owned businesses, corporates and public sector as well as to complement affirmative procurement and outsourcing.

It provides black entrepreneurs with a grant to a maximum of R1 million.

Do You Qualify for the BBSDP government grant?

  • Your business must be a CIPC Registered company or corporation
  • 50.1% black owned (Black, Indian or Coloured) or more
  • Management team 50% Black
  • Trading for at least one year and have financial statements to prove turnover.
  • Turnover must be between R250k and R35m per annum
  • Valid SARS tax clearance and Vat registered if turnover is greater than R1 000 000.

How to apply for the BBSDP government grant

The following are the documentation that you need to apply for the BBSDP grant:

  • CIPC Company registration documents (proof of ownership and shareholding)
  • Certified ID of all Directors/ members
  • Certified ID of all managers/ staff training (if applicable)
  • Certified financial statements for latest financial year (three years if available)
  • Management accounts for current year
  • Valid SARS tax clearance (with 3 months to expiry or get a new one)
  • VAT registration document (where applicable)
  • 3 Months bank statements
  • 3 Quotations (comparable) for every intervention
  • Declaration appointing Graphit as the consultant.
  • Company diagnostic questionnaire and application typed on template supplied by Graphit. Please send back as a Word Document
  • Domicillium form
  • Bank confirmation of your 50% contribution (Will you be able to get finance for your 50% or 20% contribution.) (Clear credit record)

To apply you will need to email all your documentation, all your documents need to be in a PDF format except your application form, which needs to be in word format. Please send them as individual documents.

To apply for the BBSDP government grant, send your documents to alan@bbsdp.co.za.For further information visit the BBSDP government grant website here.

7 Incubation Support Programme (ISP)

Designed to create and develop successful enterprises. These are enterprises with the ability to revitalise communities and local economies.

Do You Qualify for the Incubation Support Programme?

In order to qualify for the Incubation Support Programme you need to be:

  • A registered legal entity in South Africa
  • A registered higher or further education institution
  • A licensed and/or registered science council.

This programme is also available to applicants who want to establish their own incubators or wan t to grow and expand existing ones. The incubator may either offer physical and/or virtual incubation support services. The incubator may be a:

  • Corporate incubator
  • A private investor’s incubator
  • An academic or research institution incubator in partnership with industry

The incubator must be focused on establishing and/or growing enterprises that will graduate to sustainable enterprises.

How To Apply for the Incubation Support Programme

  1. Applicants can contact the DTI directly or appointed support agencies.
  2. They can assist you with the application process.
  3. You need to submit a completed application form to the DTI.
  4. This must outline the objectives of the project and demonstrate how the incubator would function and be sustainable.
  5. Submit your applications to the Incubation Support Programme Secretariat at the DTI.

Contact Incubation Support Programme

Application enquiries: appisp@thedti.gov.za

Claims enquiries: claimisp@thedti.gov.za




8 National Youth Development Agency (NYDA)

This government grant is moving away from grants for youth and shifting towards mentorship and development programmes. Grants are however, still available for youth entrepreneurs.

Types of NYDA Funding

NYDA awards individual grants to formal and informal businesses that are in the start-up or development phase of their business. These government grants get awarded to co-operatives, which is an autonomous association of people united to meet common economic and social goals through a jointly owned and democratically controlled enterprise. Additionally, another option is community development and facilitation projects.

Do You Qualify for NYDA funding?

  • You need to be eighteen years old at the time of application
  • Need the grant for business start-up or growth
  • You need to be between the ages of 18-35 years with necessary skills, experience or with the potential skill appropriate for the enterprise
  • South African citizens and resident within the borders of South Africa
  • Are involved in the day-to-day operation and management of the business
  • Require grant from NYDA of not less than R1 000 and not more than R100 000.

Upon approval of the grant, if you are employed full time, you could be required to resign from employment and provide grant officer with proof of resignation. This is a requirement so that you can focus an appropriate amount of time on your venture.

How to apply for NYDA funding

NYDA government grants are available to entrepreneurs or co-operatives that meet the following criteria:

  1. Applicants must be a youth (18 to 35 years old). They must have the necessary skills and experience or show the potential of skills for the business and industry in which they wish to operate.
  2. Applicants must be South African citizens with ID documents and operate their business within South Africa.
  3. The applicant must need the grant to start or grow their business i.e. no other source of capital.
  4. Applicants must involve themselves in the operation and management of the business on a day to day basis and must work on a full-time basis.
  5. The business may be formal or informal and categorised as a micro-enterprise.
  6. The enterprise must show, or have potential to be commercially viable and sustainable
  7. Applicants should be sole traders or in the case of groups have a minimum of five people.

Contact details for NYDA funding

For more information on the NYDA government grant visit www.nyda.gov.za or contact the call centre on 0800 52 52 52.

Source: http://www.entrepreneurmag.co.za/

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Unemployment – South Africa’s Ticking Time-bomb

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Employment has been declining steadily in South Africa over the past two decades. The unemployment rate was 22 percent in 1994, 25 percent in 2014, and 26.7 percent currently. According to Statistics SA, employment growth in most sectors is well below real GDP growth. Growth in South Africa’s economy has been mostly jobless.

Statistics SA released the country’s latest unemployment figures on May 15 2018, indicating that the unemployment rate has remained unchanged in the first sector of 2018, at 26.7 percent. Unemployment among young people between the ages of 24 and 35 is 35.4 percent, and there are nearly 3-million young people in South Africa not currently in training, education or active job-seeking.

The government has invested in programmes such as the Youth Employment Services [YES] initiative, but even that initiative has strict limitations, an urban focus, and excludes the agricultural sector. Upon further analysis, it becomes clear that 100,000 fewer jobs were recorded, but that that number was too low to effect an impact on the overall unemployment rate. Seven of the nine provinces reported a decline in employment rates, and agriculture lost 3,000 jobs.

The reasons for unemployment growth are complex, but the intense regulatory pressure, rising input costs, and the overall difficult environment South African businesses have to do business in, all play a role. Administrative costs are high, and employers bear a heavy burden in having to provide services to employees that government cannot.

That is not to make light of the burden employees themselves bear, taking into consideration aspects such as the spatial planning legacy our country has. Simply getting to work is no mean feat for a large percentage of employees in South Africa.

Lastly, the effect of the changing world of work cannot and should not be discounted. South Africa’s labour market is not future-proof. According to Statistics SA, nearly 75 percent of employees in South Africa are low-skilled or semi-skilled.

Youth employment should be prioritised, and not become another over-regulated initiative with very little incentive for business owners. The easier it is to do business, the more business will be done.

Automation is a very real threat to job creation, especially in an environment where the cost of labour is rising. According to Martin Ford, futurist and author of “Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future”, explains the jobs that are most at risk are those which “are on some level routine, repetitive and predictable”. In plain language, that would mean lower-skilled jobs with defined decision-making.

This would mean that where jobs are created, these need to be future-proofed. Creating large numbers of jobs where no or low skills are required, is simply displacing the problem, not solving it. In South Africa, the need is for jobs where low or no skills are needed, as that is the bracket in which most employees fall. There is, in fact, an oversupply of labour. In solving South Africa’s problem, consideration should be given to a plan that will protect these employees.

What would a solution look like? Firstly, entrepreneurship should be encouraged, and more should be done to lessen the administrative burden on small and medium enterprises [SMEs]. SMEs should be heavily incentivised for creating jobs. Incidentally, more than 80 percent of commercial farmers in South Africa meet the definition of exempt micro enterprises (EMEs) in terms of the AgriBEE sector codes — and the argument for a lessened administrative burden applies to them too.

Secondly, youth employment should be prioritised, and not become another over-regulated initiative with little incentive for business owners. The easier it is to do business, the more business will be done.

Lastly, employers should ensure that social responsibility receives equal attention to profitability in all business models. Corporate social responsibility enhances a business’ standing and image for both prospective customers and prospective employees. The days of cutthroat business, in which the bottom line was the only factor considered, are well and truly behind us.

Let us not lose sight of the time-bomb that is unemployment in South Africa because of two or three relatively stable quarters. The time to plan and find solutions to this problem is now, as we cannot afford to lose any more ground.

Suggested read – Check out https://smartmoney.co.za 

  • Source: Huffington Post – Jahni de Villiers – Head: Labour & Development, AgriSA

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BEE – What you need to know

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How Do I Become B-BBEE Compliant?

BEE (B-BBEE) is an important part of doing business in South Africa so its best that you understand every aspect about it. Use this comprehensive guide to ensure your business is compliant and performing at its best.

Content in this guide

  • What Is Black Economic Empowerment (BEE)
  • Why Is BEE Referred To As B-BBEE?
  • Who Must Comply With BEE?
  • Legislation
  • How To Qualify For BEE
  • Understanding What Each Pillar Means
  • What Are Codes Of Good Practice For Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment?
  • Levels (Of Compliance)
  • What Is SANAS?
  • Rating Process
  • What To Look For In A B-BBEE Partner

What is Black Economic Empowerment (BEE)

 

Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) is a government initiative aimed at increasing equity and uplifting black business owners, stakeholders and employees. The government refers to BEE as ‘positive discrimination’.

BEE is the process by which previously disadvantaged South Africans have been empowered through the transfer of ownership. Compliance with BEE principles are regulated by Codes, which provide details on how BEE should be implemented.


Why is BEE referred to as BBBEE?

 

When Black Employment Equity (BEE) was first implemented in the nineties, there was no coherent strategy towards its implementation. When the South African Government gazetted updated Codes of Good Practice at the beginning of 2007, it made the implementation of Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) a legal reality.

Even though most think of Black Employment Equity as BEE, as the process was refined, its name changed to Broad-Based Black Employment Equity (B-BBEE) in order to encompass not just Blacks, but Coloured, Indians and the Chinese populations of South Africa.


Who Must Comply with BEE?

 

Size is relevant in determining the levels of B-BBEE compliance. All organs of state, public entities and any private enterprise that undertakes business with a public entity must implement the Codes.

Any business providing goods or services to another business that is subject to BEE (B-BBEE) compliance may also need to provide evidence of its own BEE (B-BBEE) compliance.

The size of your business is significant in determining the required levels of BEE (B-BBEE) compliance. The Codes provide for three levels of compliance based on the size of your business:

  • Exempted Micro Enterprises (EMEs), which are businesses with an annual turnover of less than R10 million. This is a new amendment, EMEs were previously businesses with an annual turnover of less than R300 000 and less than five staff members.
  • Qualifying Small Enterprises (QSEs), which are businesses with an annual turnover of between R10 to R50 million.
  • Medium to large enterprises (M&Ls), which are businesses with an annual turnover of more than R50 million.

 

Advantages of BEE compliance

  • Allows participation in the formal South African economy
  • Companies will favour you as a client, particularly those aiming to acquire at least 50% of annual procurement from companies with BEE (B-BBEE) certificates.
  • Able to bid for Government tenders, apply for licences, get permits and are favourably considered for procurements by the Public Sector and all BEE (B-BBEE) verified enterprises.
  • Have access to tax incentives and financial grants, specifically aimed at the BEE (B-BBEE) programme.
  • Avoid long questionnaires relating to BEE (B-BBEE) when tendering for a contract.

Legislation Governing B-BBEE

 

There are three important pieces of legislation that control B-BBEE, namely:

Employment Equity Act (1998)

The Employment Equity Act applies to black people, all women and disabled people, in addition, stipulates the requirements for affirmative action to ensure that qualified people from these groups are equitably represented in all occupational categories and levels of a company.

The Act is binding on any business that employs 50 or more staff, or that has an annual turnover of more than R2 million to R25 million (depending on the industry in which you operate).

Skills Development Act (1998) and Skills Development Levy Act (1999)

These provide a framework for improving the skills and employment prospects of black people.

These Acts also make it compulsory for certain employers to contribute a percentage of their payroll (known as the Skills Development Levy) to a fund that can be used to train staff. The current generic B-BBEE scorecard awards points for skills development, but only for that which is over and above the payment of this levy.

Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act (2000)

This allows any State entity to give preference to black people when awarding contracts. It also aims to boost SME development, create new jobs and promote local enterprises in specific provinces. Currently, the regulations of this Act are based largely on ownership, but this is likely to be revised in order to align it with the B-BBEE Act and Codes.


How to Qualify For BEE (B-BBEE)

 

There are four steps you’ll need to take to ensure you qualify for BEE (B-BBEE), including:

Step 1 – Select Your Company’s Annual Turnover

The size of your business is significant in determining the required levels of BEE (B-BBEE) compliance. The Codes provide for three levels of compliance based on the size of your business:

Exempted Micro Enterprises (EMEs), which are businesses with an annual turnover of less than R10 million. This is a new amendment, EMEs were previously businesses with an annual turnover of less than R300 000 and less than five staff members.

Qualifying Small Enterprises (QSEs), which are businesses with an annual turnover between R10 to R50 million.

Medium to large enterprises (M&Ls), are businesses with an annual turnover of more than R50 million.

Step 2 – Match the Turnover to the Scorecard

EMEs are exempt. However, these businesses will automatically receive a level associated with its percentage of black ownership, such as:

Black ownership BEE (B-BBEE) Status Level Procurement Recognition
100% Black Owned EME Level 1 135%
>50% Black Owned EME Level 2 125%
<50% Black Owned EME Level 4 100%

The annual turnover must be verified by an accredited accountant, auditor or rating agency.

QSE’s used to be able to choose four out of the seven BEE Scorecard elements to score their points. However, from 2014, QSEs must comply with all 5 elements of the revised BEE (B-BBEE) Scorecard to score their points.

M&L must comply with all 5 elements of the revised BEE (B-BBEE) Scorecard to score their points.

Step 3 – Determine the Number of Pillars Required For Your Scorecard

The five pillars of B-BBEE are:

  1. Ownership (Direct empowerment)
  2. Management Control (Indirect empowerment)
  3. Skills Development
  4. Enterprise Development
  5. Socio-Economic Development.

Step 4 – Select the Pillars For Your Scorecard

Each of the pillars is worth a certain ‘weight’ in its contribution to B-BBEE compliance. The pillars contribute to overall compliance as follows:

  • Ownership                25%
  • Management                19%
  • Skills Development            20%
  • Enterprise Development        40%
  • Socio-Economic Development     5%.

Ownership, skills development and enterprise development are now considered priority pillars and a minimum of 40% compliance is mandatory, in order to achieve level 1 B-BBEE.


Understanding What Each Pillar Means

It is important to understand the requirements of each pillar.

Ownership (counts 25 points)

When determining the level of black ownership, a business will score points based on the
following:

  • The extent to which black people can influence the strategic direction of the business through their shareholding
  • The current net value of their shares
  • The amount of profit (percentage of each Rand) that accrues to all of these black shareholders.
  • Whether these shares are paid for in full, or will be within 10 years or less.
  • Bonus points are awarded if any of the black shareholders are new entrants (who have not previously benefited from a B-BBEE deal)

Management (counts 19 points)

This refers to the proportion of black people who control the direction of the business as well as those in top management who control day-to-day operations.

Skills Development (counts 20 points)

Skills development measures a business’s investment in the training and development of black employees. Only specific types of learning programmes and learnerships qualify when claiming points on the skills development scorecard.

Enterprise Development (counts 40 points)

If the business offers support programmes, then you can claim points on the scorecard. For example, if you donate a vehicle to one of your black company drivers so that he or she can start a delivery company, you qualify.

Socio-Economic Development (counts 5 points)

Companies that spend at least 1% of net profits after tax (NPAT) on Social-Economic Development (SED) are eligible for 5 points under this pillar.

Social-Economic Development (SED), however, is not Corporate Social Investment (CSI). SED’s criteria demands that those being assisted gain long-term access to the economy and receive a lasting benefit. According to the definition in the legislature, any initiative should “facilitate income-generating activities”.


What Are Codes of Good Practice For Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (B-BBEE)?

 

The Codes of Good Practice refers to options that businesses can use in order to evaluate and track their B-BBEE efforts. Within the new B-BBEE regulations companies must meet specific targets. The codes are there to guide businesses into receiving an accurate rating, which it can include on the company profile.

The Codes of Good Practice are legally binding on all state and state-owned entities. These businesses have 10 years to reach this target, which means government will have to use the Codes to measure its B-BBEE compliance when choosing suppliers, granting licences or making concessions. The cascade effect of this focus on B-BBEE compliant companies is that non-compliant businesses will find it hard to grow or maintain their level of business success within South Africa.

On the other hand, private companies will also need to apply the codes if they want to do business with any government enterprise – in order to tender for business, apply for licences and concessions, enter into public-private partnerships or buy state-owned assets.

The Act is broken up into nine Subsections.

  • Code 000: Framework for Measuring Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment
  • Code 100: Measurement of the Ownership Element
  • Code 200: Measurement of the Management Control Element
  • Code 300: Measurement of the Employment Element
  • Code 400: Measurement of the Skills Development Element
  • Code 500: Measurement of the Preferential Procurement Element
  • Code 600: Measurement of the Enterprise Development Element
  • Code 700: Measurement of the Socio-Economic Development Element
  • Code 800: Measurement of Qualifying Small Enterprises.

Sector Codes Are an Extension of Codes of Good Practice

Companies must also be aware of Sector Codes, which are an extension of the Codes, but apply within a specified industry sector only. For example, there is a Construction Sector Code (a new draft to appear in 2017), a Property Sector Code, Financial Sector Code and Tourism Sector Code. Sector codes are industry-specific interventions and measures driven by major stakeholders in industries where the codes are developed.


Levels (Of Compliance)

B-BBEE Contribution Level “Old” 
Scorecard Points
Amended
Scorecard Points
B-BBEE Procurement Recognition Level
1 ≥100 points ≥100 points 135%
2 ≥ 85 but < 100 ≥ 95 but < 100 125%
3 ≥ 75 but < 85 ≥ 90 but < 95 110%
4 ≥ 65 but < 75 ≥ 80 but < 90 100%
5 ≥ 55 but < 65 ≥ 75 but < 80 80%
6 ≥ 45 but < 55 ≥ 70 but < 75 60%
7 ≥ 40 but <45 ≥ 55 but <70 50%
8 ≥ 30 but < 40 ≥ 40 but < 55 10%
Non-Compliant < 30 < 40 0%

Customers (public and private) will prefer to interact and procure from companies with higher B-BBEE status (for its own recognition), level 1 being the ultimate goal. These are the current B-BBEE status levels:


What Is SANAS?

sanas-logo

The South African National Accreditation System (SANAS) is recognised by the South African Government as the single National Accreditation Body that gives formal B-BBEE recognition. A B-BBEE Certificate can be issued by any Verification Agency so long as they are approved to do so by SANAS. The Certificate can only be issued once a full verification has been performed and the documentation presented by your company has been verified. SANAS certificates are a formal recognition that an organisation is competent to perform specific tasks.

Ratings Agencies must perform the assessments strictly according to the guidelines set out by the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI). On successful completion it will issue a certificate with the Level (1-9) of BEE (B-BBEE) compliance appropriate to your enterprise.

  • A certificate will be issued, which is relevant to all companies requesting it.
  • B-BBEE must be validated by a SANAS accredited verification agency.
  • Self-accreditation is no longer recognised or accepted.

B-BBEE Rating Process

The rating process only applies to QSEs and M&L’s:

Step 1: Application, Approval and Payment

  • Measured Entity (ME) requests an Application Form
  • Client Manager sends Application Form to ME
  • ME completes and returns Application Form to Client Manager
  • Client Manager sends Application Form to Verifications Manager
  • Verifications Manager reviews and approves application against prescribed criteria.
  • Client Manager sends Quotation and/or Invoice to ME.
  • ME approves the quote and pays a commitment fee (65% of quoted/Invoiced amount).

Step 2: Pre-site Visit and Legal Processes

  • Client Manager prepares and sends SLA and other contracts for signature by ME
  • Lead Analyst visits ME for a briefing, to explain the verification process and to agree on Verification Plan, Team and deadlines.
  • ME prepares all required documents and sends them to Client Manager.
  • Client Manager signs-off Document Register acknowledging receipt and hands documents over to Lead Analyst.

Step 3: Analysis, Site visit, Reporting and Certification

  • Lead Analyst performs a basic analysis and measures entity against scorecard.
  • Lead Analyst visits ME on site for Verification as agreed on Verification Plan.
  • Lead Analyst prepares Verification Report and Recommendation for Verifications Manager.
  • Verifications Manager performs Vertical Assessment and Quality Assurance on report and then approves recommendation report.
  • Client Manager sends Verification Report and Rating to ME for approval.
  • ME approves Verification Report and Rating.
  • Verifications Manager issues a Rating Certificate and Final Report.
  • Client Manager sends Rating Certificate and Final Report to ME.

Who Should Manage B-BBEE Processes In a Business?

The best way to structure the management process is as follows:

  • Chief Executive Officer – Ownership and Management Control
  • Chief Financial Officer – Preferential Procurement and Enterprise Development
  • Employment Equity Committee – Socio-economic Development, Skills Development and Employment Equity.

The Employment Equity Committee needs training, as they are likely to have limited experience in making strategic recommendations to the CEO on these issues. The CEO should sit in the Employment Equity Committee along with someone with HR experience.

Did You Know?

Unlike State-owned entities, private companies are free to develop their own procurement policies, which may include different criteria and different weightings to that of the generic B-BBEE scorecard.


What to Look For In a B-BBEE Partner

When looking for a new partner, specifically for B-BBEE, companies arguably rush through the process. This could leave your business open to having two unaligned partners at the top, trying to force the business into opposite directions, thinking that they each know what’s right for the company.

Every successful business partnership needs three things:

  1. Someone who can add value to your business
  2. Operate in a growing industry
  3. Bringing additional finances or resources to the table.

A good partnership won’t happen overnight; it could take you up to 18 months to work out the details with your new B-BBEE partner. So, using it as an eleventh-hour attempt to save your business or when there’s a big tender on the line, might not work out for you.

To be successful, it’s better to go into this process with the right motives. A great B-BBEE partnership is mutually beneficial and based on growth potential for all involved.

Align Vision and Values

Partner with someone who shares your vision and values in business. Both partners need to be clear on their roles within the business and what they will need to contribute towards the business. Like all great partnerships, a B-BBEE partnership is also built on alignment.

You want a partner who will bring critical skills, experience, knowledge or maybe resources to the table. Having a partner who is only fronting can damage your business’ reputation. Fronting is when you have a partner in name only in order to qualify for a higher B-BBEE level.

Searching For the Right Partner

Networking in the wrong environment can be detrimental, just like networking in the right environment can be advantageous to you and your business.

Ask people you trust for advice or if they know someone who is compatible with you and your work style. You’ll need to approach this as a long-term endeavour as it takes time to find the right person.

Once you’ve found your new partner, structure the best deal possible through a top notch legal team. This will protect both parties if the partnership doesn’t work out. Include roles and responsibilities within the contract, so everyone is accountable, and knows what will result should the endeavour fail.

Source. https://www.entrepreneurmag.co.za/ask-entrepreneur/doing-business-in-sa-ask-entrepreneur/how-do-i-become-bee-compliant/

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5 things many Start Up Entrepreneurs get wrong.

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When starting a business, it’s easy to get lost in the fairytale of it all. So you’ll start a business and you’ll make a ton of money and then you’ll go on to retire by 30 and live on a private island and sip on foreign named-cocktails. Uhm no. Being an entrepreneur is all about early mornings and late nights, broken dreams and crushed ambitions…. or at least that’s what most entrepreneurs agree on.

Here are 5 things entrepreneurs for generations have been doing wrong:

1) Funding.

So entrepreneurs need funding, yes what for? Many entrepreneurs cannot effectively breakdown what they need funding for. Entrepreneurs tend to think that funding is the alpha and omega of starting a business. Capital is important however, this should not be a determining factor. Many entrepreneurs sell their personal assets such as their vehicles for start up funding. Investors are prone to investing in business’ where the entrepreneur has shown leadership and invested their own money in the business too.

2) Workforce.

As much as you want to, you can’t do it all. You’ll need to hire employees to assist you with your company. Be sure to be completely open with your staff on where your business stands and what your employees can expect as payment. BEFORE employing staff be sure to have a six month runway set aside for salaries. Alternatively be open to share dividends within your business.

3) Marketing.

Wow guys welcome to the 21 st Century!!! Who would’ve thought that in today’s day and age, with access to information all around us entrepreneurs still choose not to pay optimal attention to their business’ Marketing. Bizlinkworld.com is a brilliant way to assist with this, Bizlink World gives you access to the market, this tool is free too.

4) Defined Goals.

Where is your business headed? Why do you wake up every morning? You need to have clear and defined goals. It is not enough to have goals, goals need to be directed and aligned to your business. Use the SMART tool as a guideline: goals need to be Specific Measurable, Attainable, Reachable, and Timeous.

5) Roll with it.

Now as an entrepreneur you’ll know that there’s no such thing as certainty. Deals fall through in an instant, the investor doesn’t pitch to your meeting, someone else has a similar idea. Whatever the external influence it is vital that you adapt to any situation. Your business needs to be adaptable too. Refine your ideas and concepts, create your company culture, get involved with the community, teach skills. There are many ways to state your presence within an industry. Keep reinventing yourself , stay relevant!

Entrepreneurs are risk takers, determined and resilient. Whatever the risks be sure to do enough research on your solution/product/service as well as your target market. It’s a tough industry but if Bill Gates or Steve Jobs are anything to go by, the pay off is pretty amazing.

Keep at it, it gets better.

Candice Coulsen 14/9/2017

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